DeWalt DW735X Portable Planer and Stand – Assembly and Review


dewalt dw735x planer and stand

The DeWalt DW735X Planer is one of the top portable planers currently on the market. I recently purchased the DW735X with DW7350 stand as a combo deal.

My daughter’s Shiba Inu ready to help with unboxing.

What’s the Difference Between the DeWalt DW735 and the DW735X?

The only difference betweeen the DeWalt DW735 and DW735X is extra components that are included with the DW735X. These additions are an infeed and also outfeed table and an extra set of planer knives for the cutter head. In fact, if you order a DW735X, the planer itself will be marked as the DW735 model.

DW735X Infeed Table

Does the DeWalt Planer Come with Blades Already Installed?

Yes, the blades are already installed. If you’re not familiar with DeWalt planers and purchase a DW735X, it might be confusing to see blades within the package. I had to double-check on this before turning it on that a set was in fact installed. This is the extra set of blades that comes with the DW735X and will not be included with the DW735.

Does a Planer Make a Lot of Sawdust?

Yes. This was the sawdust of just a few 1×4’s I ran through. Granted, I made multiple passes, but this can get messy fast. A dust collection system is definitely recommended and will be on my list for future upgrades.

Where is the DeWalt DW735X Made?

The DeWalt DW735X Planer is manufactured in Taiwan.

Assembly of the DW735X Planer

DeWalt Planers are just about ready to be used straight out of the box. For the DW735 (and 735X), you’ll need to install the Depth Adjustment Crank Handle. The steps are pretty straight forward:

  1. Remove the screw located in the crank handle shaft (a torx driver is located in the top of the unit)
  2. Insert the crank handle over the shaft
  3. Secure in place with the screw that was just removed.
Crank Handle Shaft

Note: The Crank Handle Shaft has a keyed, flat surface on one side.

Specs for the DeWalt DW735 and DW735X

  • 3 knife cutter head
  • 2-speed gear box
  • Fan-assisted chip ejection vacuums chip off of the cutter head and exhausts them out of the machine
  • Automatic carriage lock reduces the movement that causes snipe without the need for manual engagement by the user
  • Material removal gauge and extra large thickness scale deliver accurate cuts with every pass
  • Extra large turret depth-stop allows users to return to most frequently used thicknesses with ease

DeWalt DW7350 Heavy Duty Mobile Planer Stand

The DeWalt Mobile Planer Stand has a solid 5 star review on both Amazon and other sites I checked. It does, however, come with a couple design quirks I found to be odd. Use of the foot pedal is quite awkward, especially with the cross bar support:

The second is the fact they used two nuts rather than welding a nut to the lower base to attach the leveling legs.

You’ll find holes pre-drilled (and labeled) to fit the DW735 (and DW735X) as well as the DW733/DW734. This upper shelf is made of particle board.

Shiba Inu off to the side supervising assembly.

Other Stand Options

You can always mount the DeWalt Planer to a bench or look at universal planer stand options. There are stationary and rolling stand options available from various manufacturers.

Operation of the DeWalt Planer

I haven’t used a planer since my dad helped me with a wood project back in high school. A friend of his had some weather oak. Just a few passes on the planer at the wood shop at the local Navy base had it looking pristine.

Using this planer, I certainly needed some tips on settings. This video from Make Haven provides an excellent overview:

Cost of the DeWalt DW735X

The DW735X currently retails for about $700. It was middle of November when I was looking to purchase one, so I was in search of Black Friday and Cyber Monday deals. Deals seemed quite limited, but I did come across a great sale at Acme Tools that also included the stand for $599. Amazon Prime Day apparently had the planer by itself for around $500 earlier in the year. The DW7350 Planer Stand retails for around $150.

Fabville

Kevin has been involved in the custom automotive scene since he bought his first mini-truck in high school and began modifying it. He also has interest in sustainability, DIY projects, and various forms of fabrication. Seeing improved technology of batteries, he has made a concentrated effort over the last few years to transition away from fossil fuels. From lawn care to automotive.

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